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biology articles

InverteFest December 2022

The InverteFest is here. A moment to celebrate the overlooked diversity of invertebrates around us. I’m re-posting a video I made for the Cifonauta account on Instagram showing different marine invertebrates moving around under the microscope. Enjoy! Invertebrate Gallery Check the gallery below to find out the identity of each marine invertebrate in the movie […]

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notes biology imaging

Brachiopod larva in the Nikon Small World 2021

This image of a brachiopod larva was selected in the Nikon Small World 2021 photomicrography competition!

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biology imaging notes

The blastopore of bryozoan embryos

This is a bryozoan embryo exhibiting its blastopore. These animals are discreet but ubiquitous in oceans and lakes all over the world. What we see is the DNA inside the nucleus of the cells of the embryo. The color gradient indicates if the nuclei are closer (yellow) or further away (purple) from the microscope camera. […]

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biology imaging notes

Chubby ribbon worm

A chubby ribbon worm juvenile #Nemertean #WormWednesday

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biology imaging notes

Larva of a lamp shell

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biology imaging notes

The pelagosphera larva of Sipuncula

The pelagosphera larva of #Sipuncula. Photo by Alvaro Migotto via @cifonauta http://cifonauta.cebimar.usp.br/photo/10874/

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imaging biology notes

Eye imaginal disc of Drosophila

The eye imaginal disc of Drosophila (blue=elav, pink=repo, yellow=hrp) prepared with @Bugs_and_Slugs @ZVavrusova @zeiss_micro #embryo2017

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imaging biology notes

Zebrafish laser eyes

Zebrafish embryo with laser eyes! A transgenic line for the gene Prox1 (orange) imaged with @zeiss_micro #embryo2017

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biology notes

Larval biscuit

My former – but not forgotten – larval crush is the Image of the Week on @BIOINTERACTIVE Larval Biscuit http://hhmi.org/biointeractive See A sea biscuit’s life for more.

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biology imaging notes

Cyphonautes day

The name cyphonautes was created by Ehrenberg (1834), who first saw the tiny creature on Nov. 25, 1832 (Hyman 1959).