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science notes

UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science

UNESCO released a recommendation last year with the first international framework for open science policy and practice. This is something every researcher and institution should be aware of and strive for. Science is an amazing endeavor, but it can be more diverse, inclusive, and fairer.

The video nicely sums it all up.

The four pillars of open science

UNESCO OpenScience f2
Source: https://unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000378841
  1. Open scientific knowledge (publications, research data, educational resources, software, hardware)
  2. Open science infrastructures (virtual or physical instruments, equipments, platforms, repositories)
  3. Open engagement of societal actors (crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, volunteering, citizen science)
  4. Open dialogue with other knowledge systems (indigenous peoples, marginalized scholars, local communities)

The definition of open science

For the purpose of this Recommendation, open science is defined as an inclusive construct that combines various movements and practices aiming to make multilingual scientific knowledge openly available, accessible and reusable for everyone, to increase scientific collaborations and sharing of information for the benefits of science and society, and to open the processes of scientific knowledge creation, evaluation and communication to societal actors beyond the traditional scientific community. It comprises all scientific disciplines and aspects of scholarly practices, including basic and applied sciences, natural and social sciences and the humanities, and it builds on the following key pillars: open scientific knowledge, open science infrastructures, science communication, open engagement of societal actors and open dialogue with other knowledge systems.

You can download and read the whole UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science at unesdoc.unesco.org/ark:/48223/pf0000378841. I first heard about it through the telescoper.

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science notes

( Science ( Wonder ) Art )

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science notes

Fly Station

Fly Station is ready for the #LNdWDD @mpicbg

Fly station.
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notes science

Interview for the Portrait of Science

Recently, I had the honor to be interviewed for the Portrait of Science. It’s a beautiful project created by Magdalena Gonciarz to get to know the people who do science (aka the scientists). Check out the project’s Facebook page!

Bruno C. Vellutini
Photo by Magdalena Gonciarz.
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notes science

My PhD thesis in the blog post format

I miss blogging. I began in 2006 and did it quite actively until 2011—when my posting frequency declined. During my PhD I was still drafting several posts, but ended up only publishing a few. I missed the sharing of ideas and the open discussion that a blog post can give. And this is why I decided to write the introduction of my PhD thesis as a series of blog posts.

Now that I have defended my PhD, I’ll post some sections of the text here. The thesis is accessible at the Bergen Open Research Archive (BORA – UiB):

Bruno C. Vellutini PhD Thesis

Vellutini, B.C., 2016. Comparative development of spiralian larvae. The University of Bergen. Available at: http://hdl.handle.net/1956/11465.

The first section is online. I’ll post the remaining in the coming weeks. Enjoy, comment, disagree, re-use, etc :)

  1. Endless larval forms most beautiful: what a larva is (also at The Winnower)
  2. Larvae as the epitome of evolution (also at The Winnower)
  3. Spiral cleavage, an oblique matter (also at The Winnower)
  4. Segmentation, a question of boundaries (also at The Winnower)
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notes personal science

Doktorvater

Congratulations Andreas Hejnol for debutting as a Doktorvater (doctorfather) yesterday! It is an honor to be the first of many more to come. And thank you for being the most awesome PhD supervisor I could have ever envisioned! <3

Doktorvater
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notes science

Account of an Aurora Borealis

Stumbled upon this fine depiction within past bryozoan literature: Account of an Aurora Borealis (Blackader 1827)

Account of an Aurora Borealis
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science notes

Lightsheet microscopy demo

First day of Lightsheet Z.1 demo @Sars_Centre imaging live embryos of marine worms.

Lightsheet microscopy demo
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biology notes science

Histoire de la Thécidie

Another hunt for a historical work ended successfully at @BioDivLibrary :)

Histoire de la Thécidie
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imaging notes science

Arduino is cool

Ok, now I understand why Arduino is cool.

Arduino is cool